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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 69-70

Implementing programmatic assessment across medical colleges in India


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission14-Feb-2019
Date of Decision15-Mar-2019
Date of Acceptance22-Mar-2019
Date of Web Publication20-Jul-2020

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcrsm.jcrsm_5_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Implementing programmatic assessment across medical colleges in India. J Curr Res Sci Med 2020;6:69-70

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Implementing programmatic assessment across medical colleges in India. J Curr Res Sci Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 27];6:69-70. Available from: https://www.jcrsmed.org/text.asp?2020/6/1/69/290254



Dear Sir,

The approach of programmatic assessment has been identified as the one which can neutralize all the prevailing shortcomings in the traditional curriculum.[1] In programmatic assessment, periodic formative assessments are done, and the outcome of each assessment is taken into account for the high-stakes decision.[1] Further, the outcome of these periodic formal assessments is shared with the students by the mentors so that they can plan their learning and improve themselves.[1],[2] In addition, even informal assessments (behavior of the student in the workplace, etc.) are being acknowledged by a team of faculty while taking a high-stake decision.[2] The ultimate aim of this approach is to negate subjectivity and eliminate those factors (personal, family, financial, etc.), which may appear in and around the final examination, and that can have an impact on the final outcome.[2]

Acknowledging the numerous benefits associated with the programmatic assessment, it is the need of the hour that medical colleges across India start adopting the same for producing a better graduate student.[1] However, for ensuring the smooth implementation of the same, a set of steps should be strictly followed so that we achieve what we intend to.[3],[4] The first and foremost thing is to formulate a master plan for assessment, which includes the following particulars related to examination – date, time, duration, frequency, pattern of question paper, mode of assessment, portion, etc.[1] This should be done for each of the subjects and that too across all the years of undergraduation.[1] The faculty members should be sensitized about the assessment process and the roles expected out of them.[4]

Next is to ensure that all the examinations, including low stakes, should have a scope for providing feedback to the students, which will help them to improve.[3] Further, a robust system should be adopted for collecting the information from all these periodic formal assessments.[4] The assessment is not complete unless the faculty mentors their student and aids them in developing their learning goals.[3],[4] At the same time, it is extremely important that the decisions which will be taken for any student will not be biased but will depend on the collective interpretations of all the examinations (and informal assessments) and will be taken by a team and not by the Head of Department alone.[1],[4] In addition, personalized remediation has to be encouraged for supporting each and every student.[2],[3]

The entire process should be monitored and based on the evaluation outcome of learning, and the assessment process should be revised and adapted.[4] Moreover, continuous interaction should be encouraged between different stakeholders for the betterment of the assessment process.[3] It is quite essential that the information obtained from the assessment process is used to evaluate the curriculum, as a part of the quality assurance (namely, overall improvement of the curriculum and the mode of education delivery) mechanism.[1],[2],[3],[4] However, the process of implementation of programmatic assessment is not easy, and it requires immense support from the management.[1],[5] Moreover, being a highly resource-intensive program, which requires systematic planning and involvement of all the faculty (plus all of them have to be trained), it is surely a difficult task.[1],[5]

In conclusion, programmatic assessment is the solution to our numerous problems pertaining to assessment in the traditional curriculum. It is high time that administrators from each of the medical colleges across India sit together with their stakeholders and work in a dedicated manner to bring about the much-awaited change.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Singh T. Student assessment: Moving over to programmatic assessment. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2016;6:149-50.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Wilkinson TJ, Tweed MJ. Deconstructing programmatic assessment. Adv Med Educ Pract 2018;9:191-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Heeneman S, Oudkerk Pool A, Schuwirth LW, van der Vleuten CP, Driessen EW. The impact of programmatic assessment on student learning: Theory versus practice. Med Educ 2015;49:487-98.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Timmerman AA, Dijkstra J. A practical approach to programmatic assessment design. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract 2017;22:1169-82.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Programmatic assessment of medical students: Pros and cons. Prim Health Care 2018;8:302.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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